Waterborne Diseases

Water-borne diseases are any illness caused by drinking water contaminated by human or animal faeces, which contain pathogenic microorganisms.
The full picture of water-associated diseases is complex for a number of reasons. Over the past decades, the picture of water-related human health issues has become increasingly comprehensive, with the emergence of new water-related infection diseases and the reemergence of ones already known. Data are available for some water-, sanitation- and hygiene-related diseases (which include salmonellosis, cholera, shigellosis), but for others such malaria,
schistosomiasis or the most modern infections such legionellosis or SARS CoV the analyses remain to be done. 
The burden of several disease groups can only partly be attributed to water determinants. Even where water plays an essential role in the ecology of diseases, it may be hard to pinpoint the relative importance of aquatic components of the local ecosystems.

Water realated diseases:
Arsenicosis
Ascariasis
Botulism
Campylobacteriosis
Cholera
Cryptosporiodiosis
Cyanobacterial toxins
Dengue
Diarrhoea
Dracunculiasis
Fluorosis
Giardiasis
Hepatitis
Hookworm infection
Japanese encephalitis
Lead poisoning
Legionellosis
Leptospirosis
Lymphatic filariasis
Malaria
Malnutrition
Methaemoglobinemia
Onchocerciasis
Polio
Ring Worm or Tinea
Scabies
Schistomiasis
Trachoma
Trichuriasis
Typhoid